Decoding Labels: Oroweat 100% Whole Wheat Bread

Bread is a contentious subject in the health food community these days. Low-carbers argue that all bread is evil because it’s high in carbohydrates. Paleo dieters argue that bread is evil because it’s made with neolithic grains that your body isn’t adapted to digesting. Fans of Wheat Belly argue that modern wheat is evil because it’s been so hybridized it’s no longer actually healthy for us. Others aren’t against bread, per se, but are against bread containing gluten.

But if you’re a health-conscious bread eater, chances are you stick to whole grain breads. You buy a loaf of sandwich bread that claims to be “Whole Wheat” or “Whole Grain.” You may have even bought Oroweat’s 100% Whole Wheat Bread.

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STANDARD FTC DISCLOSURE: In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. Please note that I only ever endorse products that are in alignment with Food Renegade's ideals and that I believe would be of value to my readers. You may read my full disclosure statements here.

Decoding Labels: V8 Splash, Strawberry Kiwi

You can’t go wrong with vegetable juice, right? Everyone knows that stuff is healthy, healthy, healthy. While fruit juice is controversial among the health-conscious crowd, I never hear anyone diss vegetable juice. You’ve all heard that fruit juice concentrates the sugars in the fruit to an unhealthy degree. A tall glass of apple juice, for example, can be made from the juice of 15 apples! Since no one ever sits down to eat 15 apples at once, you can imagine how a 16oz. glass of apple juice can give you quite the sugar kick. Who cares if it’s natural sugar? It’s still a heck of a lot of sugar without very much of the other goodies that make eating whole fruits worthwhile — like pectin and fiber.

But vegetable juice? No one complains about that. It’s vegetables! A few, like carrots, may be a little sweet. But really? Who’s gonna say juicing a carrot is unhealthy? Even the low-carb people won’t knock you for downing a glass of V8.

So, what happens when a company known for it’s unadulterated, 100% vegetable juice drink decides to branch out? When they decide to start making new flavors and cashing in on our penchant for sweet drinks? That’s when you get products like V8 Splash: Strawberry Kiwi.

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STANDARD FTC DISCLOSURE: In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. Please note that I only ever endorse products that are in alignment with Food Renegade's ideals and that I believe would be of value to my readers. You may read my full disclosure statements here.

Decoding Labels: Annie’s Organic Cheddar Bunnies

Convenience foods are just that — convenient. As a mother, I fully understand the urge to have convenience foods ready so that I can grab them as the kids and I head out the door to run errands or meetup with others for a play date. If we didn’t leave the house with at least some snack food, I’d be even more tempted to eat out than I already am. After all, nobody likes being hungry. Being crammed into a car with a group of hungry kids? Now that’s a recipe for soaring tempers, picky squabbling, and other unpleasantries.

I have to confess, crackers like these Annie’s Homegrown Organic Cheddar Bunnies are tempting. They’re the perfect size for a toddler’s grasp. They pack easily in ziplock baggies and tuck nicely away into a purse or handbag. And they’re certified organic! They even profess to be GMO-free and have 0g of trans fats. Even the cheese used is organic and growth-hormone free.

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STANDARD FTC DISCLOSURE: In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. Please note that I only ever endorse products that are in alignment with Food Renegade's ideals and that I believe would be of value to my readers. You may read my full disclosure statements here.

Decoding Labels: Newman’s Own Organics Fig Newmans

I like my cookies soft. Soft and chewy. This usually means I dip crispy cookies in raw milk to soften them, but sometimes I indulge in a chewy cookie. Because of this predilection, old-fashioned Fig Newtons used to be my favorite cookie. Those little gems are soooo soft. Of course, those wonderful soft cookies had to be abandoned when I began prioritizing traditional, real food in my diet.

Then, a couple months ago at the grocery store something totally unexpected caught my eye. Organic fig newtons? Could it be? I saw a package of Newman’s Own Organics Fig Newmans staring back at me.

I did what I always do when faced with the prospect of something yummy and convenient. I picked up the bag, turned it over, and read the ingredients label. This is what I found.

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STANDARD FTC DISCLOSURE: In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. Please note that I only ever endorse products that are in alignment with Food Renegade's ideals and that I believe would be of value to my readers. You may read my full disclosure statements here.